From The Case Files: Agave Snout Weevil

Agave Weevils LCWhat Are Agave Snout Weevils?
Agave Snout Weevils are inch-long, dusty black, wingless insects and — as their name suggests — are particularly fond of Agave. Adults are known to lay their eggs between the leaves of Agaves, and the hatching larvae burrow into the plant. Infestation causes Agaves to collapse into a rotting mess during late summer and early fall.

How Do I Know If My Agave Is Infested?
Agaves 1 LCTypically, an Agave Snout Weevil infestation is not discovered until the damage is too severe to save the plant. As the insects feed on the plant, they inject a bacterial infection, causing the leaves begin to wrinkle. The leaves will continue to shrivel over time as the infection moves through the heart of the plant. You might also notice a foul odor as the plant rots. The Agave will eventually collapse, leaving only the central spikes of the plant still standing. By this point, rehabilitating the plant is unlikely.

Agaves 2 LCHow Do I Eradicate Them?
Once you’ve recognized that you have an Agave Snout Weevil problem, it’s important that you remove all dead and infected plant parts from your garden. DLC’s Experts recommend inspecting the surrounding soil for adult weevils or larvae. Any remaining adults or larvae must be removed to avoid the infestation of other plants.

The key to eradicating Agave Snout Weevils is proactive prevention. Once the pests have infected your Agave, it’s nearly impossible to reverse the damage. The best thing you can do is prevent future attacks from claiming the lives of other plants. DLC’s Experts suggest applying a pesticide with Imidacloprid as the main ingredient around the base of the plant in early April and again in late May. Imidacloprid is a systemic insecticide so it will work its way from the base through the entire plant and keep Agave Snout Weevils from feeding on it. Pesticides containing Imidacloprid can be found at your local home improvement store or nursery. As with any pesticide, follow the instructions on the label for proper use.

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